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The Post-2008 Crisis and the Crisis of Higher Education in Cyprus

The Post-2008 Crisis and the Crisis of Higher Education in Cyprus

Victor Roudometof, President of the University of Cyprus’ Faculty Labor Union Historically, Cyprus lacked its own public universities; the first ...

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Portuguese Science: Chronicle of Death Foretold

Portuguese Science: Chronicle of Death Foretold

Helena Carreiras, Senior researcher, Center for Research and Studies in Sociology, ISCTE, Lisbon, Portugal The Portuguese government decided to overhaul ...

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The Crisis of Public Universities in Indonesia Today

The Crisis of Public Universities in Indonesia Today

Lucia Ratih Kusumadewi and Antonius Cahyadi, University of Indonesia The Indonesian Reforms of 1998 brought about massive social change. Ever ...

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Germans Boycott University Rankings

Germans Boycott University Rankings

Scientific Evaluation, Yes – CHE Ranking, No Methodological Problems and Political Implications of the CHE University Ranking German Sociological Association ...

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Neoliberalism and Higher Education: The Australian Case

Neoliberalism and Higher Education: The Australian Case

Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney [1] When neoliberal policies in Australia began to bite in the sphere of higher education, towards ...

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Carnage in Aleppo University in Syria

Carnage in Aleppo University in Syria

Eighty-seven people were killed and at least 150 injured in two explosions that struck Aleppo University in Northern Syria this ...

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Calls for Academic Freedom: Reflections on Palestine and Israel

Calls for Academic Freedom: Reflections on Palestine and Israel

Feras Hammami, KTH, Royal Institute of technology, Stockholm, Sweden “Israeli academic freedom is under severe attack”. This was written in a ...

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Report Finds Risky Money Managment by University of California

Report Finds Risky Money Managment by University of California

A report released last week by UC Berkeley students, reveal the staggering human costs of University of California’s interest rate ...

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By Abdul-Mumin Sa’ad, University of Maiduguri

There are a myriad of problems in Nigerian Public Universities, which, if nothing is done, will lead to their disintegration. Here are some of the challenges we are facing in Nigeria – challenges that the authorities are making no concerted effort to  tackle.  

Faculty-Student Ratio. The first serious problem is the enormous student population, served by all too few faculty (academic staff). The National Universities Commission (NUC), a body regulating academic standards for universities, calls for a maximum of faculty-student ration of 1:40, but most universities in Nigeria have at least 1:100 faculty-student ratio. In humanities and social sciences courses, classes with at least 400 students are common place.

Low Quality of Faculty. The faculty-student ration is exacerbated by the poor qualification of faculty. The majority of faculty in most departments do not have doctorate degrees, which is contrary to the NUC requirement that at least 50% of the faculty should have doctorate degrees. What is more, it is not uncommon to find faculties with only first degrees handling the most advanced (400 level) courses on their own, while they are supposed to be only graduate assistants to senior faculty. Prospects for such graduate assistants and those with masters degrees to further their education are very dim due to poor or near absence of funding for personnel development. For those faculty with doctorate degrees, climbing to senior positions such as Senior Lecturer, Reader/Associate Professor and Professor is a herculean task due to the absence of research grants and funds to present papers at even national conferences.  Thus, the principle of “publish or perish” in Nigerian universities is not a function of intellectual capacity per se but that of economic misfortune.  …READ MORE

 To: Acad. Nikola SABOTINOV, D.Sc.

President of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences

 To: Assoc. Prof. d-r Sergei Ignatov,

Minister of Education, Youth and Science of the Republic of Bulgaria

 To: Executive Council of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences

 Position in defence of sociology and its academic institute

From: Scientists from the Institute of Sociology at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences

1. A proposal of the Executive Council of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences for restructuring the institutes in the area of the social sciences, announced on 15 January 2010, envisages the creation of three new institutes – Institute for economic and social research, Institute for demographic and psychological research, Institute for research of societies, values and knowledge and preserving the present Institute for legal studies

2. The proposed restructuring of the institutes in the area of the social sciences:

  • has not got a clear vision, is based on confusion of different approaches (disciplinary and subject-oriented) and shows a lack of logical coherence in determining the names and areas of research of the different institutes;
  • creates a feeling of mimicry rather than of real reform and innovation;
  • goes against the recommendations of the international assessment, which specifically call for an authentic fundamental sociology, integrated in international science and organised in a research unit with a clear scientific profile.

…READ MORE