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The Post-2008 Crisis and the Crisis of Higher Education in Cyprus

The Post-2008 Crisis and the Crisis of Higher Education in Cyprus

Victor Roudometof, President of the University of Cyprus’ Faculty Labor Union Historically, Cyprus lacked its own public universities; the first ...

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Portuguese Science: Chronicle of Death Foretold

Portuguese Science: Chronicle of Death Foretold

Helena Carreiras, Senior researcher, Center for Research and Studies in Sociology, ISCTE, Lisbon, Portugal The Portuguese government decided to overhaul ...

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The Crisis of Public Universities in Indonesia Today

The Crisis of Public Universities in Indonesia Today

Lucia Ratih Kusumadewi and Antonius Cahyadi, University of Indonesia The Indonesian Reforms of 1998 brought about massive social change. Ever ...

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Germans Boycott University Rankings

Germans Boycott University Rankings

Scientific Evaluation, Yes – CHE Ranking, No Methodological Problems and Political Implications of the CHE University Ranking German Sociological Association ...

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Neoliberalism and Higher Education: The Australian Case

Neoliberalism and Higher Education: The Australian Case

Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney [1] When neoliberal policies in Australia began to bite in the sphere of higher education, towards ...

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Carnage in Aleppo University in Syria

Carnage in Aleppo University in Syria

Eighty-seven people were killed and at least 150 injured in two explosions that struck Aleppo University in Northern Syria this ...

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Calls for Academic Freedom: Reflections on Palestine and Israel

Calls for Academic Freedom: Reflections on Palestine and Israel

Feras Hammami, KTH, Royal Institute of technology, Stockholm, Sweden “Israeli academic freedom is under severe attack”. This was written in a ...

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Report Finds Risky Money Managment by University of California

Report Finds Risky Money Managment by University of California

A report released last week by UC Berkeley students, reveal the staggering human costs of University of California’s interest rate ...

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The provincial government’s plans to raise tuition by 75% over the next five years—the most drastic in the history of higher education in the province—have mobilized students and others to take to the streets in Quebec. Although Quebec would continue to have the lowest tuition rates in the country, even after the tuition increase, students joined their peers worldwide in protesting the crippling costs of higher education and growing student debt. After three months of street demonstrations and boycotts, the provincial government passed an emergency law last Friday, restricting public demonstrations and stipulating heavy fines for protestors. The law has only stoked the flames of protest, resulting in dozens of arrests nightly. To mark the 100th day of protest in what many are calling the “Printemps érable” or Maple Spring, a major demonstration is scheduled to take place tomorrow.

Read more about what is at stake in this struggle.

Read about the latest developments, including the call for a summer of protests, here.

Earlier last month and again more recently, news outlets reported that the Obama Administration promised to wind down the war in Afghanistan, by removing tens of thousands of US troops by summer 2012 and placing Afghan security forces into lead combat roles. The promises may lift hopes for peace in that region; but it will take a very long time for life in Afghanistan to return to ‘normal.’ In the meantime, however, everyday life continues under difficult circumstances: universities try to function as institutions of higher learning and students try to be students.

This article provides a rare glimpse into what university students face in a war-torn country. Characterizing their dormitory’s conditions, one student quipped “that suspected terrorists in United States custody enjoyed better living conditions…the real Guantanamo is here.” Read the full article here.